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IEEE ComSoc Technology News Special Issue on 5G

CTN Issue: May 2014

The Mobile Communications Industry is on the move again, innovating and inventing its way to pervasive always-on, always-connected broadband 5G services. Realizing these services is not trivial; challenges include the interoperability and/or evolution of seven billion 2G-3G-4G existing mobile connections worldwide.  It also must consider overcoming a mature environment that is already approaching theoretical speed, bandwidth and performance limits. This issue of CTN presents a selection of the most-read trending IEEE ComSoc articles from academia, R&D leaders, and industry insiders; they reveal and define for us:

  1. What is 5G?
  2. What disruptive technologies are shaping 5G?
  3. How fast is 5G?
  4. What will be different in 5G networks, devices and connections?
IEEE ComSoc Technology News Special Issue

Five Disruptive Technology Directions for 5G

CTN Issue: May 2014

The authors present the five technologies for 5G that could lead to both architectural and component disruptions: (1) device-centric architectures, (2) millimeter wave; (3) massive MIMO; (4) smarter devices; and (5) native support for machine-to-machine communications. The key ideas for each technology are described, along with their potential impact on 5G and the research challenges that remain.

IEEE Communications Magazine

Cellular Architecture and Key Technologies for 5G Wireless Communication Networks

CTN Issue: May 2014

The fourth generation wireless communication systems have been deployed or are soon to be deployed in many countries. However, with an explosion of wireless mobile devices and services, even 4G systems cannot adequately address issues such as the spectrum crisis and high energy consumption. Wireless system designers have been facing demand for increasingly higher data rates. 5Th generation (5G) wireless systems will address these needs and more and are expected to be deployed by 2020. This article proposes cellular architectures that separate indoor and outdoor scenarios. In addition, it discusses various promising technologies for 5G wireless communication systems, such as massive MIMO, energy-efficient communications, cognitive radio networks, and visible light communications.

IEEE Communications Magazine

5G: Personal Mobile Internet beyond What Cellular Did to Telephony

CTN Issue: May 2014

Cellular technology has dramatically changed our society and the way we communicate. First it changed voice telephony, then moved into data access, applications, and services. However, the Internet has not yet been fully exploited by cellular systems. With the advent of 5G we will have the opportunity to leapfrog beyond current Internet capabilities.

IEEE Communications Magazine

IEEE ComSoc Technology News Special Issue on Communications and Network Security

CTN Issue: April 2014

Communications and network security deal with the operations undertaken to protect and defend networked communication systems by ensuring their availability, integrity, authentication, confidentiality, and non-repudiation. Availability implies that networks, end systems like databases, and applications must be survivable and fault tolerant. Networked systems should have sufficient working and spare capacity to operate under attacks, and should be designed with alarms, restoration protocols, and management configurations to detect a problem and automatically diagnose and respond to the attacks. Communications and network security also include integrity, authentication, confidentiality, and non-repudiation of both user and management information. The continually increasing reliance on networked communication technology by businesses, the general public and government services and their role in the critical infrastructure makes it imperative to have security technologies built into them.

IEEE ComSoc Technology News Special Issue

A Reliability Perspective of the Smart Grid

CTN Issue: April 2014

Increasing complexity of power grids and tighter integration of renewable resources continue to present reliability challenges that require a quantum leap in harnessing information and communications technologies leading to the “smart grid”. To meet these challenges, this paper envisions a grid-wide IT architectural framework to support a multitude of geographically and temporally coordinated monitoring, analysis, and control actions over multiple timescales from milliseconds and up, through distribution of intelligence using autonomous agents. The architectural approach envisioned in the paper presents an IT framework that addresses ever-increasing grid reliability challenges by responding to steady-state and transient operating conditions in real-time more effectively and thus enabling self-healing capabilities, through utilization of modern sensing, communications, computing and control systems.

IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid

Residential Load Control: Distributed Scheduling and Convergence With Lost AMI Messages

CTN Issue: April 2014

Demand response, or load control, enables interactions between end-users and the grid through adapting end-users’ energy consumption to time-based pricing signals. This paper deals with the scheduling issue of demand response in residential distribution networks. The utility company considers a cost function representing the cost of providing energy to end-users. End-users’ smart appliances that can perform demand response include air-conditioning units and chargers of plug-in electric vehicles. In addition, operation of smart appliances away from desired power levels can lead to user dissatisfactions. The key problem is to minimize the electricity provider cost plus the dissatisfaction across users. The paper develops a distributed algorithm to solve the problem. 

IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid