Validation of a non-line-of-sight path-loss model for V2V communications at street intersections

CTN Issue: March 2014 International Conference on ITS Telecommunications

This paper validates a reference non-line-of-sight (NLOS) pathloss model named VirtualSource11p for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications in urban street intersections. Such validation is conducted with the help of independent channel measurement data. Vehicles that are approaching a street intersection often have NLOS communication from the vehicles in the other street, because buildings at the corner block the line-of-sight communication path. In such situations, the scattering of radio waves (i.e., reflection, diffraction, and refraction) from objects in the surroundings implicitly enable the signal reception. It is observed that the geometry of the street intersections, i.e., street width and alignment, structure of buildings, and antenna height, have great impacts on the received signal power. This is especially true when there is NLOS in an urban intersection at the 5.9 GHz frequency, a frequency dedicated for V2V communications. A proper pathloss model is needed to estimate the received signal strength between a certain distance from the transmitter to the receiver. The authors show that the VirtualSource11p model is very flexible and fits most of the measurements well. The few exceptions happen when the street intersections have a rich scattering environment.

 

International Conference on ITS Telecommunications (ITST) 2013 best paper award

Title and author(s) of the original paper in IEEE Xplore:
Title: Validation of a non-line-of-sight path-loss model for V2V communications at street intersections
Author: T.Abbas, A.Thiel, T. Zemen, C.F.Mecklenbrauker, F.Tufvesson
This paper appears in: 2013 13th International Conference on ITS Telecommunications (ITST)
Issue Date: November 2013

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