Small, Low-Power, Connected Sensors: "Energy Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs) for Ubiquitous Object Networking"

CTN Issue: December 2014

Small, Low-Power, Connected Sensors: "Energy Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs) for Ubiquitous Object Networking"

Authors: Gorlatova, M. ; Kinget, P. ; Kymissis, I. ; Rubenstein, D.; Xiaodong Wang ; Zussman, G.
Title: "Energy Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs) for Ubiquitous Object Networking"
Publication:  Wireless Communications, IEEE - December 2010

Small, low-power active devices are the focus of this article describing Energy-Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs): Small, flexible devices that gather energy from light, vibration or other environmental sources. EnHANTs are capable of transmitting up to 30 feet (9 meters) without consuming much energy, acting as wireless transceivers that use ultra-wideband to send short pulses or bursts of information. The device could, for example, transmit 2 megabits of data per second by sending 3- to 4-nanosecond pulses every half-microsecond. EnHANTs are small, flexible devices that gather energy from light, vibration or other environmental sources. The authors describe that the end goal is to make these devices inexpensive, so they can be attached to items, such as books, clothing, toys, furniture and even to produce.

This article won the IEEE Communications Society Award for Advances in Communication in 2011.  Earlier this year, at the Advanced Communications Symposium organized by IEEE North Jersey Section, we caught up with Peter Kinget, one of the authors of the article. He gave us an update on the research which included and update on EnHANTs for the Internet of Things (IoT), and using ultrasound for data transmission in smartphones.

You can watch Peter Kinget’s update in IEEE ComSoc Beats TV Channel (beats.comsoc.org) or in ComSoc’s YouTube Channel in this link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-4pVOcG8o4

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